2018-11-07 / Front Page

Sheriff ’ s Office Takes Trick- or- Treat to School


(L-R): Chief Deputy Robert Grier, C.H.A.M.P.S. Instructor Melanie Williams, mascot, Investigator Tyrone Burns, and Sheriff Scott Worsley. (L-R): Chief Deputy Robert Grier, C.H.A.M.P.S. Instructor Melanie Williams, mascot, Investigator Tyrone Burns, and Sheriff Scott Worsley. With the City of Colquitt not being able to participate in Trick-or-Treat this year due to Hurricane Michael, the Miller County Sheriff’s Office, along with the C.H.A.M.P.S. mascot dog, decided to take trick-or-treat to the kids at school.

Sheriff Scott Worsley, Chief Robert Grier, Investigator Tyrone Burns, K9 Officer Garison Clenney, and C.H.A.M.P.S. Instructor Melanie Williams decided to surprise the students with bags of candy and a first time visit from the C.H.A.M.P.S. mascot dog. Sheriff Worsley stated, “The past few weeks have been different for our children, and we just decided that we needed to make sure our children were able to have a Happy Halloween.” The sheriff and deputies handed out candy to all the students at MCES as they paraded by in their costumes. They even got to shake hands with the drug dog.


C.H.A.M.P.S. mascot giving Jack Griffin Donley a bag of candy. C.H.A.M.P.S. mascot giving Jack Griffin Donley a bag of candy. C.H.A.M.P.S. instructor, Melanie Williams would like to thank all the C.H.A.M.P.S. sponsors. Without them, the mascot dog would not have been possible.

Choosing healthy activities and methods promoting safety is what C.H.A.M.P.S. stands for. This program is taught to fifth graders in the state of Georgia by certified deputies. The program is approved by the local sheriff and is a part of the Georgia Sheriff’s Association. It is a 12-week program that teaches topics that will help students make good choices in life when it comes to saying no to drugs, water safety, home alone, bullying and many more topics.

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