2015-03-11 / Front Page

It's a Hit - 'Lost & Found'

By Terry Toole


There are some young 'performers' coming along in Swamp Gravy that could be great. There are some young 'performers' coming along in Swamp Gravy that could be great. Colquitt-Swamp Gravy's production, “Lost and Found” opened this past weekend to sold-out audiences.

Opening Night was a particularly special evening, featuring a mostly hometown crowd to celebrate Local's Night. The energy in the building that night was high, and the audience leapt to their feet for the cast members as they took their final bow. This special opening night had a special price for locals, since we are the crowd that the cast gets to practice on. If the rest of the productions are any better, we locals, should go back and cough up some more money. It was great.

Our 101-year-old "house guest,” Uva, hasn't missed a production since it started over 22 years ago. She can't see too well, walk too sure-footed, or hear all that wonderfully, but she could tell they were acting out a scene about her late twin sister lending a set of her false teeth to a neighbor to go to a funeral. This true story was especially interesting since the borrower was also buried with the borrowed teeth.


Never go bumming empty-handed is one of the lessons learned in the play. Never go bumming empty-handed is one of the lessons learned in the play. All the stories in the Swamp Gravy production are mostly true. The names are usually changed to protect the innocent and the guilty. There might be a line added to enhance the story for the productions.

The "trial" opening night was great. The acting, singing and stories were true Swamp Gravy tales that will make you laugh, cry or wet your pants if you waited too long. That's why the production at Cotton Hall keeps on keeping on to bring in thousands of visitors to this small, rural community as they put on their plays.

They have gone on the road with invitation to the Olympics in Atlanta, to the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., before U.S. presidents, congressmen and dignitaries from around the world.

Over 90 percent of the cast and production is from right around Colquitt and Southwest Georgia. Occasionally a Yankee is invited, like director, Richard Geer, from Illinois, or Gerald Stropnicky of Pennsylvania, to share in our Southern glory, Swamp Gravy.

If you have yet to enjoy this season's Swamp Gravy production, there are nine more performances this March.

Get your tickets by calling the Colquitt/Miller Arts Council at 229-758-5450 or by going online at www.swampgravy.com.See show dates in the ad on page 9 of this edition.

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